26.11.2014

Final submission of 9 interaction design patterns for video learning environments

Yes­ter­day I fi­nis­hed my 10 month work on two pa­pers for the Eu­ro­pean Con­fe­rence of Pa­tern Lan­gua­ges of Pro­grams 2014, held at Ir­see Monastry/​Bavaria. When sub­mit­ting con­fe­rence pa­pers the num­ber of ex­ter­nally trig­ge­red re­vi­si­ons of your pa­per is lo­wer or equal then two. Once the re­viewer pro­vi­des a feed­back you can in­cor­po­rate it in your pa­per. Sel­dom the edi­tor needs to ad­vice you to ful­fil the aut­hors gui­de­lines.
At Eu­ro­PLoP you get gui­ded by a she­pherd that pro­vi­des you feed­back on four to five ite­ra­ti­ons be­fore sub­mit­ting the pa­per for the con­fe­rence. That means hard work on the text.
But it co­mes even bet­ter when you get the chance to hear others dis­cus­sing our pa­per in one of the wri­ters work­shops at the con­fe­rence. Any de­fence of the aut­hors points of view or back­ground con­side­ra­ti­ons is preven­ted in or­der to ob­tain the mes­sage that other re­a­ders ob­tain from your writ­ten work.

Maybe more in­te­res­ting is the re­sul­ting con­tent of the two pa­pers I've submitted.

In­ter­ac­tion de­sign pat­terns for in­ter­ac­tive vi­deo play­ers in video-​​based learning environments

This pa­per is about in­ter­ac­tion de­sign pat­terns that de­scribe com­mon so­lu­ti­ons of reoc­cur­ring pro­blems in the de­sign and de­ve­lop­ment of video-​​based learning en­viron­ments. The pat­terns are or­ga­ni­zed in two lay­ers. The first layer in­cor­po­ra­tes the mi­cro in­ter­ac­tivity in the vi­deo player its­elf. Any ma­ni­pu­la­tion that ef­fects the pre­sen­ta­tion wi­t­hin the vi­deo or in­ter­ve­ning its play­back is part of the micro-​​level of in­ter­ac­tivity. Cur­rently, 17 pat­terns have been iden­ti­fied for that layer. Five of them will be ob­ject of that ar­ti­cle: An­no­ta­ted Ti­me­line, Clas­si­fied Marks, Play­back Speed, User Tra­ces, and Vi­sual Sum­mary.
The se­cond layer of the pat­tern lan­guage con­sists of 12 pat­terns that de­scribe in­ter­ac­tivity on a macro-​​level. Macro in­ter­ac­tivity com­pri­ses all ma­ni­pu­la­ti­ons con­cerning one or more vi­deos as a whole. That does not in­clude the play­back but the or­ga­ni­sa­tion and struc­ture of the vi­deo learning environment.

In­ter­ac­tion de­sign pat­terns for de­sign and de­ve­lop­ment of vi­deo learning environments

This pa­per is about in­ter­ac­tion de­sign pat­terns that de­scribe com­mon so­lu­ti­ons of reoc­cur­ring pro­blems in the de­sign and de­ve­lop­ment of video-​​based learning en­viron­ments. The pat­terns are or­ga­ni­zed in two lay­ers. The first layer in­cor­po­ra­tes the mi­cro in­ter­ac­tivity in the vi­deo player its­elf. Any ma­ni­pu­la­tion that ef­fects the pre­sen­ta­tion wi­t­hin the vi­deo or in­ter­ve­ning its play­back is part of the micro-​​level of in­ter­ac­tivity. Cur­rently, 17 pat­terns have been iden­ti­fied for that layer. Five of them will be ob­ject of that ar­ti­cle: An­no­ta­ted Ti­me­line, Clas­si­fied Marks, Play­back Speed, User Tra­ces, and Vi­sual Sum­mary.
The se­cond layer of the pat­tern lan­guage con­sists of 12 pat­terns that de­scribe in­ter­ac­tivity on a macro-​​level. Macro in­ter­ac­tivity com­pri­ses all ma­ni­pu­la­ti­ons con­cerning one or more vi­deos as a whole. That does not in­clude the play­back but the or­ga­ni­sa­tion and struc­ture of the vi­deo learning environment.

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